sponsored by Mosquito Authority
What is Zika?
Zika virus disease is caused by a virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. People with Zika virus disease usually have symptoms that can include mild fever, skin rashes, conjunctivitis, muscle and joint pain, malaise or headache. These symptoms normally last for 2-7 days. There is no specific treatment or vaccine currently available. The best form of prevention is protection against mosquito bites. (Source: World Health Organization)
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5 Things YOU Need to Know About ZIKA
ZIKA is smart.
There is a lot we don’t know yet about the Zika virus, like how it is transmitted, how many types of mosquitoes carry it, and what kinds of complications it can cause (like the connection to microcephaly and Guillain-Barré Syndrome.)

Sexual transmission is now known. The first Zika case in the U.S. has been confirmed in the Dallas area, and it was sexually transmitted by someone who had traveled to a Zika-infected area.

UPDATE: A Brazil lab has found evidence of Zika in saliva and urine. It is unknown whether the virus can be transmitted via these bodily fluids.
Travel can be dangerous.
Mexico, Central America, the Carribean Islands and much of South America have been identified as Zika-affected areas. Pregnant women have been advised not to travel to these areas at all. Other people traveling to these areas should take great care to prevent mosquito bites.
Women who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant should be extra careful.
The biggest risk of which we are aware is the virus’ link to microcephaly, a condition causing infants to be born with abnormally-small heads and brains.
There is no treatment or cure.
Prevention is key. Remember: Drain, Dress, Defend. Remove standing water, wear long sleeves and long pants, and use repellent.
It's not the only threat...
Mosquitoes transmit many other diseases that impact the United States directly. West Nile, Eastern Equine Encephalitis and Dengue are just a few examples of diseases that cause permanent disabilities and even death right here in our own back yards each and every year. 
ZIKA NEWS
Zika outbreak: ‘The more we learn, the worse things seem to get’
The top U.S. health officials leading the response to the mosquito-borne Zika virus sweeping through the hemisphere said its growing links to a broad array of birth defects and neurological disorders are worse than they originally suspected, increasing the risk for devastating harm during pregnancy.
Until Zika, "there has never been a mosquito-borne virus that could cause serious birth defects on such a large scale," Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Thursday during a conference call with reporters.
Click HERE to view this story on the Washington Post Web site.
World Health Organization:
Zika virus - Questions & Answers
Mosquitoes and their breeding sites pose a significant risk factor for Zika virus infection. Prevention and control relies on reducing mosquitoes through source reduction (removal and modification of breeding sites) and reducing contact between mosquitoes and people.
During outbreaks, health authorities may advise that spraying of insecticides be carried out. Insecticides recommended by the WHO Pesticide Evaluation Scheme may also be used as larvicides to treat relatively large water containers.
Click HERE to access the WHO Zika Virus Fact Sheet.
CDC issues new safe-sex guidelines around Zika virus
Active Zika virus has been detected in saliva and urine, a Brazilian public health institute said Friday, posing new questions for researchers trying to understand how the virus could spread.

The presence of Zika in bodily fluids doesn't necessarily mean you can get sick from contact with an infected person's saliva or urine, said CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Click HERE to read the full article at CNN.com.
ZIKA has been declared an international emergency.
The World Health Organization declared the Zika virus and its suspected link to birth defects an international public health emergency, a rare move that signals the seriousness of the outbreak and gives countries new tools to fight it. 
Click HERE to read the full article at NYTimes.com. 
U.S. Red Cross: Wait 28 days to donate blood after visiting Zika areas
In response to the Zika outbreak, the American Red Cross is asking people to avoid donating blood if they traveled to Latin America or the Caribbean in the past 28 days.
Click HERE to read the full article at BBC.com.
Experts: USA must prepare now for Zika virus
U.S. public health officials must prepare now for the inevitable arrival of Zika virus, a mosquito-borne infection that has spread to 22 countries and territories in the Americas and poses particular danger to pregnant women, health experts said.
Click HERE to read the full article at USAToday.com. 
ZIKA RESOURCES
sponsored by Mosquito Authority
World Health Organization:
Zika virus - Questions & Answers
5 Things YOU Need to Know About ZIKA
ZIKA is smart.
There is a lot we don’t know yet about the Zika virus, like how it is transmitted, how many types of mosquitoes carry it, and what kinds of complications it can cause (like the connection to microcephaly and Guillain-Barré Syndrome.)

 
Sexual transmission is now known. The first Zika case in the U.S. has been confirmed in the Dallas area, and it was sexually transmitted by someone who had traveled to a Zika-infected area.

UPDATE: A Brazil lab has found evidence of Zika in saliva and urine. It is unknown whether the virus can be transmitted via these bodily fluids.
Travel can be dangerous.
Mexico, Central America, the Carribean Islands and much of South America have been identified as Zika-affected areas. Pregnant women have been advised not to travel to these areas at all. Other people traveling to these areas should take great care to prevent mosquito bites.
Women who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant should be extra careful.
The biggest risk of which we are aware is the virus’ link to microcephaly, a condition causing infants to be born with abnormally-small heads and brains.
There is no treatment or cure.
Prevention is key. Remember: Drain, Dress, Defend. Remove standing water, wear long sleeves and long pants, and use repellent.
It's not the only threat...
Mosquitoes transmit many other diseases that impact the United States directly. West Nile, Eastern Equine Encephalitis and Dengue are just a few examples of diseases that cause permanent disabilities and even death right here in our own back yards each and every year. 
ZIKA NEWS
Zika outbreak: ‘The more we learn, the worse things seem to get’
Until Zika, "there has never been a mosquito-borne virus that could cause serious birth defects on such a large scale," Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Thursday during a conference call with reporters.
Click HERE to view this story on the Washington Post Web site.
World Health Organization:
Zika virus - Questions & Answers
During outbreaks, health authorities may advise that spraying of insecticides be carried out. Insecticides recommended by the WHO Pesticide Evaluation Scheme may also be used as larvicides to treat relatively large water containers.
Click HERE to access the WHO Zika Virus Fact Sheet.
CDC issues new safe-sex guidelines around Zika virus
The presence of Zika in bodily fluids doesn't necessarily mean you can get sick from contact with an infected person's saliva or urine, said CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

Click HERE to read the full article at CNN.com.
ZIKA has been declared an international emergency.
The World Health Organization declared the Zika virus and its suspected link to birth defects an international public health emergency, a rare move that signals the seriousness of the outbreak and gives countries new tools to fight it. 
Click HERE to read the full article at NYTimes.com. 
U.S. Red Cross: Wait 28 days to donate blood after visiting Zika areas
In response to the Zika outbreak, the American Red Cross is asking people to avoid donating blood if they traveled to Latin America or the Caribbean in the past 28 days.
Click HERE to read the full article at BBC.com.
Experts: USA must prepare now for Zika virus
U.S. public health officials must prepare now for the inevitable arrival of Zika virus.
Click HERE to read the full article at BBC.com. 
ZIKA RESOURCES
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